These Amazing Vintage Pictures Show How The Hoover Dam Was Constructed

In 1936, over the Colorado river, US, the Hoover Dam was constructed and is by far the largest Concrete Formwork dam in the country. It confines within the Nevada and Arizona and is also taken as a major tourist spot in the country. It took five long years in the formation and completion of the massive dam. While more than 5000 people were involved in the rising, almost 112 lives were lost and the reasons of demise varied from drowning to falling from the height of the dam.

 

The Game Changer

Did you know that years back, during that time, Nevada was overlooked and Las Vegas, which has a different identity now, was a tiny deserted town with only a few thousand people residing there? It won’t be wrong to say that it’s the construction of the Hoover Dam which totally changed the picture as it supplied enough water to the region calling more people to reside here.

Although the dam is a big name now, take a look at the hard work and various stages of it during the construction process.

The elevator shown below was used to take the workers safely on the construction site.

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Various tunnels were carved out to allow emergency flow and generation whenever needed.

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The steel bucket sort of thing shown was used to move the concrete inside the deep dense tunnels.

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It’s almost eighty years now but the equipment used then were quite innovative for that time. Like this scaffolding and drilling rig that was used to tunnel through.

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The project was a big thing, even folks from the US Bureau of Reclamation had visited the site for the inspection.

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The concrete mixing plant was of a great help in providing the cementing material during the construction process. Although the Hoover is not the largest dam in the world but is surely a masterpiece and is a great example of the marvelous and innovative engineering at that time.

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Interesting, isn’t it? Share your thoughts about it in the comments below!